GRANITE.EASYBOO.COM/NORTHERN IRELAND

Granite Surfaces Northern Ireland By The Granite Kitchen Company

granite kitchens logo

Suppliers and fitters of Distinctive Granite Kitchens in Northern Ireland

Professionally Manufactured Designer Kitchens Using High Quality Polished Granite.

For Kitchens In Northern Ireland Use Granite.

Contracts Can Be Undertaken On Behalf Of Builders Or Home Improvement Companies Or For Commercial Or Domestic Customers

We Can Supply To Your Own Specification Or Complete Your Project From Start To Finish

Phone Granite Designs Northern Ireland Free On 0800 8818103

Granite Designs Northern Ireland For Any Of The Following

Granite Kitchens Northern Ireland

Contract Fitting Designer Kitchens and Specialised Fitting

Granite Ideas for Conservatories Kitchens and Utility rooms

Specialised Granite Fitting for Retail Premises Pubs and Clubs

Many granite products supplied and fitted even if not listed click here for help

FREE PHONE GRANITE PRODUCTS NORTHERN IRELAND ON

0800 881 8103

Grants And Financial Assistance

About Us
old-windows-wanted

Your Personal Contact at Granite Designs Northern Ireland
Trevor

FREE PHONE 0800 881 8103

Self Employed? We Have Contracts Available : Free Registration

GRANITE WORK SURFACES NORTHERN IRELAND

 

GRANITE PRODUCTS NORTHERN IRELAND Acknowledge Wikipedia for the following information

FOOTBALL

On 18 February 1882, two years after the founding of the Irish FA, Ireland made their international debut against England, losing 13-0 in a friendly played at Bloomfield Park in Belfast. This remains the record win for England and the record defeat for the Northern Ireland team. The Irish line-up that day included Samuel Johnston, who at the age of 15 years and 153 days became the youngest international debutant of the 1800s. On 25 February 1882 Ireland played their second international against Wales at the Racecourse Ground, Wrexham and an equaliser from Johnston became Ireland’s first ever goal. The goal also saw Johnston become the 1800s youngest ever international goalscorer. In 1884 Ireland competed in the inaugural British Home Championship and lost all three games. Ireland did not win their first game until 19 February 1887, a 4-1 win over Wales in Belfast. Between their debut and this game, they had a run of 14 defeats and 1 draw, the longest run without a win in the 1800s. Despite the end of this run, heavy defeats continued. On 3 March 1888 they lost 11-0 to Wales and three weeks later on 24 March they lost 10-2 to Scotland. Further heavy defeats came on 15 March 1890 when they lost 9-1 to England, on 18 February 1899 when they lost 13-2 to England and on 2 February 1901 when they lost 11-0 to Scotland. In 1899 the Irish FA also changed its rules governing the selection of non-resident players. Before then the Ireland team selected its players exclusively form the Irish League, in particular the three Belfast-based clubs Linfield, Cliftonville and Distillery. On 4 March 1899 for the game against Wales, McAteer included four Irish players based in England. The change in policy produced dividends as Ireland won 1-0. Three weeks later, on 25 March one of these four players, Archie Goodall, aged 34 years and 279 days, became the oldest player to score in international football during the 19th century when he scored Ireland’s goal in a 9-1 defeat to Scotland. In 1920 Ireland was partitioned into Northern Ireland and Southern Ireland. In 1922, Southern Ireland gained independence as the Irish Free State, later to become Republic of Ireland. Amid these political upheavals, a rival football association, the Football Association of Ireland, emerged in Dublin in 1921 and organised a separate league and international team. In 1923, at a time when the home nations had withdrawn from FIFA, the FAI was recognised by FIFA as the governing body of the Irish Free State on the condition that it changed its name to the Football Association of the Irish Free State. The Irish FA continued to organise its national team on an all-Ireland basis. Between 1928 and 1946 the IFA were not affiliated to FIFA and the two Ireland teams co-existed, never competing in the same competition. However on 8 March 1950, in a 0-0 draw with Wales at the Racecourse Ground, Wrexham, the IFA fielded a team that included four players who were born in the Irish Free State. As well as being part of the qualifier for the 1950 FIFA World Cup. All four players had previously played for the FAI in their qualifiers and as a result had played for two different associations in the same FIFA World Cup tournament. After complaints from the FAI, FIFA intervened, and restricted players' eligibility based on the political border. In 1953 FIFA ruled neither team could be referred to as Ireland, decreeing that the FAI team be officially designated as the Republic of Ireland, while the IFA team was to become Northern Ireland. The IFA objected and in 1954 was permitted to continue using the name Ireland, and to select players from throughout the island in the non-FIFA regulated British Home Championship.

Dalbeattie In Dumfries and Galloway Is Said To Be The Birthplace Of Granite Polishing. Granite Quarrying Craignair quarry is a notable town landmark Formerly granite quarrying was an important part of the Dalbeattie economy. The most prominent of which is the characteristic Craignair quarry which is clearly visible to the west of the town. Dalbeattie Granite works was established in 1820 and was situated in Craignair Street, following a direct route from Craignair quarry. The industry died down locally around 1883 due to cheaper imports from Denmark. Many of the workers immigrated to other parts of the world in order to find work, a number immigrated to the USA to work at a sister quarry in Westerly, Rhode Island. Dalbeattie is credited with developing the technique of polishing granite stone to form a shiny surface. This technique was exported throughout the world by the skilled workers of Dalbeattie as they travelled.

HOME