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Granite Surfaces Slough By The Granite Kitchen Company

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Suppliers and fitters of Distinctive Granite Kitchens in Slough

Professionally Manufactured Designer Kitchens Using High Quality Polished Granite.

For Kitchens In Slough Use Granite.

Contracts Can Be Undertaken On Behalf Of Builders Or Home Improvement Companies Or For Commercial Or Domestic Customers

We Can Supply To Your Own Specification Or Complete Your Project From Start To Finish

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Granite Kitchens Slough

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GRANITE PRODUCTS SLOUGH Acknowledge Wikipedia for the following information

Slough (pronunciation (help·info); IPA: /ˈslaʊ/) is a Borough and unitary authority within the ceremonial county of Berkshire, England. At the time of the 2001 census, the population of Slough was 119,070 (est. 122,000 in 2006) and the borough area was the most ethnically diverse local authority area outside London in the United Kingdom.[1] Slough is home to the Slough Trading Estate, the UK's first such estate, which, coupled with extensive transport links, makes it an important business centre in South East England. It is also home to a campus of Thames Valley University. Slough is at grid reference SU978797 and is situated to the west of Greater London. Proximate towns include Windsor to the south, Maidenhead to the west, Uxbridge to the northeast and Bracknell to the southwest. Contents [show] * 1 History o 1.1 Current developments * 2 Governance o 2.1 Boundaries o 2.2 Town twinning * 3 Geography * 4 Demography * 5 Economy * 6 Transport o 6.1 Road transport o 6.2 Rail transport * 7 Sports * 8 Negative Perceptions * 9 Cultural references * 10 See also * 11 References * 12 External links [edit] History Main article: History of Slough Former GWR locomotive 6664 photographed at Slough. circa October 1955. Former GWR locomotive 6664 photographed at Slough. circa October 1955. The first recorded uses of the name occur as Slo in 1196, Sloo in 1336, and Le Slowe, Slowe or Slow in 1437. It first seems to have applied to a hamlet between Upton to the east and Chalvey to the west, roughly around the "Crown Crossroads" where the road to Windsor (now the A332) met the Great West Road.[2] The Domesday Survey of 1086, refers to Upton, and a wood for 200 pigs, worth £15. During the 13th century, King Henry III had a palace in Cippenham. Parts of Upton Court were built in 1325, while St Mary's Church in Langley was probably built in the late 11th or early 12th century, though it has been rebuilt and enlarged several times. From the mid 17th century, stagecoaches began to pass through Slough and Salt Hill which became locations for the second stage to change horses on the journey out from London. By 1838 and the opening of the Great Western Railway, Upton-cum-Chalvey's parish population had reached 1,502. In 1849, a branch line was completed from Slough station to Windsor and Eton Central railway station for the Queen's greater convenience. Slough has 96 listed buildings.[3] There are four Grade I: St Laurence's church (Upton), St Mary the Virgin's church (Langley), Baylis House and Godolphin Court; seven Grade II*: St Mary's church (Upton-cum-Chalvey), Upton Court, the Kederminster and Seymour Almshouses in Langley, St Peter's church (Chalvey), The Ostrich Inn (Colnbrook), King John's Palace (Colnbrook); and Grade II listed structures include four milestones, Slough station, and Beech, Oak and Linden Houses at Upton Hospital. Artist's impression of the Heart of Slough Project Artist's impression of the Heart of Slough Project 1918 saw a large area of agricultural land to the west of Slough developed as an army motor repair depot, used to store and repair huge numbers of motor vehicles coming back from First World War in Flanders. In April 1920 the Government sold the site and its contents to the Slough Trading Co. Ltd. Repair of ex-army vehicles continued until 1925 when the Slough Trading Company Act was passed allowing the company (renamed Slough Estates Ltd) to establish the world's first Industrial Estate.[4] Spectacular growth and employment ensued, with Slough attracting workers from many parts of the UK and abroad. After the Second World War, several further large housing developments arose to take large numbers of people migrating from war-damaged London.

Dalbeattie In Dumfries and Galloway Is Said To Be The Birthplace Of Granite Polishing. Granite Quarrying Craignair quarry is a notable town landmark Formerly granite quarrying was an important part of the Dalbeattie economy. The most prominent of which is the characteristic Craignair quarry which is clearly visible to the west of the town. Dalbeattie Granite works was established in 1820 and was situated in Craignair Street, following a direct route from Craignair quarry. The industry died down locally around 1883 due to cheaper imports from Denmark. Many of the workers immigrated to other parts of the world in order to find work, a number immigrated to the USA to work at a sister quarry in Westerly, Rhode Island. Dalbeattie is credited with developing the technique of polishing granite stone to form a shiny surface. This technique was exported throughout the world by the skilled workers of Dalbeattie as they travelled.

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